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FREE TO ALL 



7 



THE LIVERPOOL HOSPITAL 



FOR 



NCER AND SKIN DISEASES. 



FOUNDED 1862. 



^resfacMS. 

ms worship the mayor. 

B. HORSFALL, ESQ., M.P. | 8. R. GRAVES, ESQ., M.P. 



JOSEPH HARRISON, ESQ., T.C. 
R. C. J ANION, ESQ., T.C. 

JOHN ROGERS, ESQ., T.C. 
KEY. J. R. WELSH, A.M. 
THOMAS LEE, ESQ. 

J. K. MAINWARING, ESQ. 



(Committee. 

JAMES M C NEILLEDGE, ESQ. 

F. H. POWELL, ESQ. 

W. L. STROUD, ESQ. 

A. F. THOMSON, ESQ. 
WILLIAM BOSTOCK, ESQ. 

H. TRISTRAM, ESQ. 

Hon. Sec., pro. tern. 

Honorary Surgeon. 

J. SEATON SMYTH, ESQ. 

low of the Royal College of Surgeons, and Member of the Royal College of Physicians. 

on . , 3ssist.=Surgcons. 

I 






DR. ADAM. 



DR. MACKINLAY. 



Honorary treasurer. 

J. SKED, ESQ., ALLIANCE BANK. 



■?Uttittor. 

ASTRUP CARISS, ESQ. 



Hsstst.=Scc. anH Collector. 

MR. JOHN HENRY EATON, 24, ST. JAMES-ROAD. 



_ptatron. 



MRS. 



CU BLE Y. 



MINTED BT LEE AND NIOHTINGALE, CASTLE STREET, LIVERPOOL. 

1868. 



P 3b0 



REPORT OP THE COMMITTEE. 



At the close of another year the Committee have much 
pleasure in submitting their Eeport of the Liverpool 
Cancer and Skin Hospital to the donors and subscribers. 
The steady progress it has made in public favour may be 
estimated by the largely increased list of supporters, and 
the advantages to Liverpool and its neighbourhood will 
be best appreciated by reference to the number of 
applicants and the localities from which patients have 
come. For brevity we annex a comparison of the last 
three years : — 

In 1865 were entered 1,800, of which 1,120 recovered. 

,, 1866 „ 2,724, „ 1,708 

„ 1867 „ 3,164, „ 2,740 

If those rem aini ng under treatment at close of 1866 
be added to the past year, the number will amount to 
3,826, and the weekly attendance, ranging from 530 to 
750, gives us a total of 31,476 applicants during 1867. 

The Committee beg to express their thanks to the 
Corporation of Liverpool for so generously conferring on 
this Hospital an Annual Grant of £50, and especially to 
mark their appreciation of the invaluable services ren- 
dered to the Charity by the eloquent advocacy of its 
cause in the Council Chamber, as well as the large- 
hearted benevolence displayed to it individually on this 
and every occasion, by Mr. Eobertson Gladstone. 

They beg to notice also an important element in the 



4 



working of this Hospital, namely, the late fees, which 
amount this year to £90 10s. Explanatory of this 
revenue, it may he stated that although this Hospital is 
free to all, out-patients coming after the appointed hour 
of admission, or those desirous of having precedence, so 
that they may, by receiving early attention, retain their 
situations, are obliged to pay a late fee. Of course, 
patients holding subscribers’ recommendation notes take 
precedence of all others without fee. 

The attendance has been so large during the year that 
the Committee have resolved to enlarge the waiting- 
room; and the cases of Cancer requiring in-door treat- 
ment are becoming so numerous and urgent that an 
additional Ward, to accommodate 25 patients, is indis- 
pensable ; in order to carry out these alterations they 
have appealed to the public for a Building Fund, and 
they have every reason for congratulation on the result. 

The Committee also beg to express them thanks to 
the Worshipful the Mayor for his liberal donation, 
but especially for the earnest Christian charity by which 
he has sought to promote the welfare and interest of this 
Hospital. In conclusion they confidently appeal to the 
public for similar encouragement to enable them to 
extend the usefulness of an Institution which has 
proved itself worthy of the favour and support hitherto 
so liberally accorded to it. 



The Committee have also to express their thanks to the following 
ladies for donations of old linen : — Mrs. Salt, Grove-street, Miss 
Harrison, Argyle-strect, Birkenhead ; Mrs. Bright, Woolton ; Mrs. 
H. F. Penny, Wavertree. 



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By Balance brought down £55 13 S . id. 

Examined and found correct. 

. SEED, Eon. Treasurer. ASTEUP CAEISS, Accountant, 

Liverpool, lUh January , 1868. Bakk Chambers, 3, Cook-street, 



MEDICAL REPORT. 



As statistical records offer few attractions to any save 
professional readers it has been thought advisable to 
supplement the Eeport with some explanatory remarks, 
having reference to the objects and mission of this 
Hospital, and its peculiar claim to special support. 

The diseases of which it takes cognizance may with 
propriety be ranged under two heads — constitutional, 
which includes cancer' and scrofula; and the acquired, 
which embraces every other variety. The former is- 
associated in the minds of most persons with some unfor- 
tunate hereditary taint, to which they themselves have 
little proclivity ; the latter with all that is repulsive to 
the feelings, and from which happily they anticipate 
especial exemption. 

“ All men think all men mortal but themselves.” 

They cannot realize the possibility, or are unwilling to 
admit the fact, that whether inherited by blood or 
acquired by contagion every member of the human 
family has indisputable right to a fair proportion of all 
these maladies, although by temperaments or circum- 
stances, favourable or the reverse, these may be modified,, 
intensified, or temporarily averted, yet 

“ To this complexion all at last must come.” 

The terms cancer and scrofula, though familiar to the- 
ear as household words, breathed but in whispers in each- 



7 



stricken home, designated by friends as some malignant 
disorder or kind of decline, proscribed however carefully 
in name, there is not a circle, rich or poor, from which 
these diseases can be excluded ; they have set the seal 
of their respective diathesis on every human being, 
and as 

“ There *s a point 

By nature fixed whence life must downward tend,” 
so the tendency of all chronic skin diseases, as life 
advances or vital powers decline, is to assume one or 
other of these fatal forms. The simple tumour, attended 
with but slight pain ; the enlarged gland, productive of 
little inconvenience ; strumous ulcers, apparently trivial ; 
warty excrescences, exciting but slight suspicion; all, 
however insignificant in their origin, may, by neglect or 
improper treatment, become malignant in their action, 
or degenerate into consumption. Now, as the province 
of this Hospital is to prevent such a consummation, it is 
ours to invite those so afflicted to seek early advice and 
assistance, to warn them of the danger in allowing these 
disorders to gain such hold upon their constitutions as to 
preclude all means of cure and hope of recovery, and 
this, too, in the face of an institution opening wide its 
gates to prevent such calamities, and daily, by its 
practical results, achieving the very boon it originally 
held out to others and now promises to all ; and to assure 
them emphatically that cancer in its primary stage, with 
a single point of manifestation in a temperament not 
favourable to its development, is perfectly amenable to 
treatment. Such being my conviction it becomes my 
duty in the cause of humanity to enter my protest 
against the opinion so popularly entertained regarding 



8 



its utter incurability, in every stage and form, inasmuch, 
as it has been the means of sacrificing many valuable 
lives ; thousands taught thus to regard their case as 
hopeless, and their disease as inflicting disgrace upon 
their family, have brooded over their misfortune in 
silence and sorrow, until, wasted alike by mental distress 
and physical suffering, death has relieved them of a 
burthen too heavy to bear. It is very difficult to decide 
whether these gloomy and unscientific views are more 
pernicious in their tendency and results than those erring 
in the opposite extreme, relative to diseases of the skin 
in general, which have heretofore been regarded as of so 
little moment as to be professionally unworthy of study, 
and socially undeserving of notice. The few who are 
practically and personally unacquainted with cutaneous 
affections may be excused for cherishing such fond belief, 
for the subject is neither inviting nor attractive ; yet if 
we reflect for one moment on their highly contagious 
properties, the mutual dependence of class upon class, 

ci Whatever link we’strike, 

Tenth, or ten-thousandth, breaks the chain alike 

if we bear in mind that every trade is obnoxious to one 
or other of these various maladies, and that no period of 
life enjoys immunity from their attack, it is impossible, 
socially or individually, to overrate their importance or 
that of a Hospital specially devoted to their successful 
treatment. Our calculation of the usefulness of such an 
institution must be based not merely upon the number 
relieved, but on the thousands that have thereby been 
saved from similar afflictions ; its value must be measured 
not so much by the diseases cured as by those which, but 
for it, might have become incurable. Had those suffering 



9 



from cancerous, scrofulous, lupoid ulcerations, and leprous 
affections no place for treatment, the sights on our very 
streets would ere long become so revolting — the dread of 
contagion so overpowering— loss of employment so 
general, and the consequences to society so serious — that, 
out of self-defence, workhouses would have to be increased 
fourfold to give the victims shelter, or lazar-houses 
rescusitated to enforce their seclusion. 

If the reader can, by any possibility, be ignorant of 
the nature and severity of these diseases, or incredulous 
as to their prevalence, let him visit the Hospital and 
witness for himself the cases which are daily brought 
under observation. We ’ll suppose him to have lost 
children, and that the recollection of such bereavement 
has but endeared others more fondly to his soul, let him 
look around at the little sufferers mutely appealing for 
commiseration ; they may not remind him of those 
whose joyous laugh and merry prattle were wont to bid 
him welcome and his cares beguile ; for have they not 
been nurtured in poverty and reared in filth ? their bodies 
covered with scabs, their heads with corruption, their 
faces with masks half-putrified — wearing but the sem- 
blance of humanity — from the purlieus and dens of our 
overcrowded streets they come not to excite sympathy 
but to obtain relief. Measured by time, how short the 
ispan of their existence — by disease, how long! Only 
ithink of what these might have been, and let them pass. 
We ’ll suppose that he has lost one that was dearer to 
Ihim than life itself, with cancer ; how many are there in 
:that crowded waiting-room — wives and mothers — whose 
dives are as important to their families and friends as 
ihers whose memory is still so fondly cherished; many 



10 



of them, alas ! through feelings of false delicacy, have 
kept the secret of their infirmities “not wisely but too 
well,” and have only sought assistance when the disease 
had reached its last and hopeless stage. 

We ’ll suppose him to take an interest in the 
labouring class ; mark, how fully it is represented with 
ulcers in the legs, boils, abscesses, and erysipelas, which 
incapacitate for work ; always bearing in mind that such 
incapacity in the strong man represents destitution in 
his family. 

Has he domestics on whose personal cleanliness the 
very health and happiness of his household depend? 
then, see for himself one whose clear complexion and 
robust frame would place her far above suspicion, covered 
with itch or a leper beneath her raiment from head to 
foot. 

We might draw attention to needlewomen, whose 
enervating, sedentary occupation, long hours, loss of rest, 
and imperfect nourishment, inducing acnoid pimples and 
blotches, unfit them for seeking or executing orders on 
which their very livelihood depends ; and to waiters 
who have to give up their places when attacked with 
eczematous or other eruptions. 

It would be easy thus to exemplify by cases the varied 
phases of disease, and, instead of these rough sketches, to 
produce pictures more highly finished, striking, and 
elaborate. But instead of the dark colours requisite for 
such portraiture, let me rather employ brighter tints to 
depict the effect, and bring into bolder relief the objects 
— curative and preventive — attained by this institution. 

Through all the protean forms of eczematous, impeti- 
genous, and pruriginous distempers, it has enabled 



11 



helpless infancy, unharmed, to ford their thrice-polluted 
stream and cross the stepping-stones of childhood. 

It has been the means of soothing these and s imil ar 
afflictions equally distressing, but more impatiently borne 
by the aged, 

Whose tottering' steps made Nature’s hour-glass tremble, 

As the few hasty sands were ebbing to the last. 

It has enabled the labourer in times like the present, 
■when work was scarce and distress abundant, to keep a 
home, however impoverished, over his head, and retain 
his employment, by receiving immediate attention during 
the brief space allotted to his mid-day meal. 

It has, by keeping contagious diseases in abeyance, 
afforded protection to families whose servants, even when 
under treatment for such affections, use every precaution, 
however detrimental and lamentable the consequence, 
to evade detection, knowing that the penalty would be 
instant dismissal. 

It has induced numbers suffering from tumours to 
submit them to early treatment and removal by operation, 
or other remedies judiciously applied, before the system, 
vitiated with the virus, had converted them into fixed 
and fatal forms of cancer, 

Unseen, emitting odours inapproachable ; and if the face become 

The subject of its touch, so quick, so hideously transformed the 
features, 

By those known best scarce recognized, by friends avoided ; 

Or if some remain who wish them well, they wish them well in 
heaven. 

Will any, on referring to the classified list and exam- 
ining the work done during the past, refuse encourage- 
ment to this institution in future years ? Yet there was 



a time when this Hospital had to contend with difficul- 
ties almost insurmountable — not from honest, honourable 
adversaries, for these could have been openly and fear- 
lessly encountered, but from secret calumny and pro- 
fessional jealousy; for 

“ Envy will merit as its shade pursue. 

But like a shadow proves the substance true ; 

Carps at the charity it will not teach, 

And hates that excellence it cannot reach.” 

But still the work went bravely on, and from the eight 
hundred applicants of the first, the number steadily 
increased until in this, the close of our sixth, year, the 
tread of nearly thirty-two thousand human beings 
admitted within our portals has been duly echoed by 
relief so unequivocal as to have silenced for ever the 
clamorous voice of gratuitous detraction. 

The Hospital, besides being regularly attended by 
the principal practitioners in Liverpool, has been visited 
by some of the leading physicians of Great Britain and 
Ireland, who have made this branch of study their 
speciality, and its reputation, so far from being like other 
provincials — merely local — has attracted patients from 
all parts of the United Kingdom. These facts, in con- 
nection with the warm expressions of gratitude from 
those relieved, have cheered and encouraged the Medical 
Officers through many a weary hour; and the writer, 
who has never personally asked a favour for this Institu- 
tion, has all the more pleasure now that the opportunity 
is afforded him in offering his heartfelt thanks to those 
whose generous benevolence and earnest co-operation 
have raised this Hospital even to its present state of 
efficiency and usefulness. The work performed is but 



13 



an earnest of that which it is destined to accomplish. 
The good it has effected but foreshadows a mission 
still more extended and noble. 

. now ^is picture, embodying six years’ enthu- 
siastic, faithful however imperfect — labour, must bo 
deft on the easel. Your sympathy and charity, kind 
: reader, may have supplied its brighter colours ; sorrow 
.and affliction have imparted its darker shadows. Its 
1 lights and shades are yet but very partially brought 
iinto relief ; the foreground must hereafter be filled 3 in 
•>with many a figure, and the pencil that has now faintly 
( drawn its outline may touch but little of its perspective ; 
nt may next , year or the following be guided by other 
hands than mine, but the painting will still remain 
;unfinished when yours and mine are laid powerless in 
: ;he dust, long, long after we have entered into our rest, 





40, RoDNEY-STltEET, 

January 14 th, 1868. 



14 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF DISEASES. 



Diseases. 


Males. 


Females. 


Recovered. 


Relieved 
and under 
Treatment. 


Lost sight 
of or Dead. 


3 

o 

H 


Camcer.* 














Scirrhus 


31 


189 


104 


103 


16 


223 


Medullary 


5 


18 


8 


13 


2 


23 


Epithelial 


30 


11 


41 


— 


— 


41 


Scrofula 


58 


73 


25 


106 


— 


131 


Ulcers. 














Scrofulous 


89 


101 


90 


100 


— 


190 


Varicose 


31 


78 


54 


55 


— 


109 


Lupus. 














Exedens > 


33 


59 


( 44 


19 






Non-Exedens j 






( 17 


12 




> 


Abscesses 


69 


79 


148 


— 


— 


148 


Syphilis — Secondary and Tertiary. 














Psoriasis 


16 


9 


11 


14 


— 


25 


Eczema 


19 


29 


18 


30 


— 


48 


Pityriasis 


27 


36 


4S 


15 


— 


63 


Rubeola 


4 


1 


5 


— 


— 


5 


Rupia - 


11 


15 


15 


11 


— 


26 


Variola 


7 


2 


4 


5 


— 


9 


Condylomata (warty excrescences) ... 


6 


8 


14 


— 


— 


14 


Siwens 


1 


2 


3 


— 


— 


3 


Tumours. 














Fibrous 


6 


12 


18 


— 


— 


18 


Cystic 


10 


8 


18 


— 


— 


18 


Steotomatous 


14 


26 


40 


— 


— 


40 


Adipose 


8 


15 


23 


— 


— 


23 


Eczema (humid tetter and scall) 


183 


216 


252 


147 




399 


Impetigo (crusted tetter) 


296 


211 


120 


387 


— 


507 



* Cancer . — Those marked “Recovered” have been operated on successfully 
and have had no recurrence of the disease ; of those “ Relieved and under Treat- 
ment,” the disease has only in six cases re-appeared— in one, contiguous to the site 
of operation — in five, other parts of the body have been attacked. The remainder 
have presented themselves when their cases' were hopeless— some having sought 
no advice previously, others after treatment by various practitioners. 

One case we would direct attention to as worthy of notice, inasmuch as 
operative procedure had never previously been practised on any at so advanced an 
age : the patient, 82 years of age, had his arm amputated for cancer of the hand, 
and made an excellent recovery. 



15 



Diseases. 


Males. 


Females. 


Recovered. 


u, , 
•a ® t 

S'? « 

Set 

*E- 


Lost sight 
of or Dead. 


Total. 


rabies (itch) 






240 




1 




upia 




129 


32 


— 


272 


lephantiasis 




30 


46 


13 


— 


50 


■.thyosis (fish skin) 


13 


2 


■ 


3 


— 


3 


apra (leprosy) 




o 


11 


8 





19 


5oriasis 


TQ 


56 


43 


3S 


— 


81 


.tyriasis 




14 


10 


17 


— 


27 






lob 


145 


66 


— 


211 


3ERIGO. 

Decalvans (scall head) 


3 


0 










Favus 


4 




1 


4 


— 


5 








2 


2 


— 


4 


erpes 


13 










31 


mphigus (watery blebj.... 


2 


Q 


26 


5 


— 


sthyma 


13 


Ofi 


0 







5 


me (worm pimple and blotch face) 
cosis (disease of beard) 


38 
26 

39 
49 


77 


30 

46 


9 

69 


— 


39 

115 

26 


•ticaria (nettle-rash) 


60 


16 


3 


' ’ 


ysipelas 


/O 


lb 


1 


yij 


ythema 


60 




llo 




— 


118 


rnion (chilblains) 


1 


3 


vl 


45 




137 


nions 




9 










rrucae (warts) 


4 


3 








2 


mua 


l 












avi (birth-marks) 


5 


18 

9 


23 

Of) 






l 

9Q 


runculi (boils) 


11 






90 


thrax (carbuncles) 


5 


3 


8 

15 

1 94 






8 

15 

1 79 


ychia (whitlow) .. 


7 


8 

87 






:hen .... 


85 






ophilus 




3 


3 






3 


seola 


1 


3 


4 






4 


rpura 














.ea 


8 

3 


4 


9 


3 




12 

5 


pecia (baldness) 


2 




5 




icose Veins 


34 


48 


34 


4S 




82 


lgrene 


3 


1 


4 




4 


•ngo (old man’s itch) . 


9 


10 


15 


4 





19 


icella ... 




2 


2 




, 


2 


mre Ani . 


3 


2 


1 


4 




5 


'bus Pedicularis 


8 


3 


11 




- 


11 


ihiasis . 


4 


1 


5 


. 


. . . 


5 


luscum ... 


3 


2 


5 


- - 





5 


deolum ... 


2 


1 


3 


__ 


- - 


3 


ropeon .. 


4 


3 


7 


__ 





7 










1 







16 



RECAPITULATION. 



Males 

Females 


2,119 

\ 1 


Recovered 

Relieved 

Died 






3,823 




3,823 



OPERATIONS. 



Cancer 

Tumours 

Abscesses 

Varicose Veins 

Birth-marks 

'Whitlow 

Removal of Deadbone in Ulcers, dependent 

on Necrosis 

Fissure Ani 

Besides these, there were several operated on for Fistula and other diseases 
wherein irritating discharges had induced erythematous inflammation, which 
could not have been overcome without operation. 

It is gratifying to be able to add that although the anaesthetics in common 
use, besides those recently discovered, have been constantly employed, their 
administration has not been attended with a single fatal result. This may in 
some measure be accounted for by the employment of our newly -invented 
Inhaler, which, combining as it does, safety to life with celerity in producing 
anaesthesia, will, no doubt, ere long be brought into general use. 



87 

86 

148 

7 

23 
15 

24 

6 



17 



LIST OF LOCALITIES FROM WHICH PATIENTS HAVE 

ATTENDED. 



i Lancashire. 

Liverpool 

Bootle 

Walton 

Wavertree 

Woolton ..1 

Old Swan 

"West Derby 

Knotty Aih 

Seaforth 

Waterloo 

Crosby 

Aintree 

Bainford 

Huyton 

Cbildwall 

Hale and Halewood. . 

Prescot 

Hartlepool 

Eceleston 

Lancaster (Pressil) .. 

Warrington 

Croxteth 

Winsford 

Kirby 

Freshfield 

Bolton 

Earlstown 

Manchester 

Southport 

Ormskirk 

St. Helens 

Garston 

Litherland 

Wigan 

Settle 

Gateacre 

Widnes 

Parn worth 

Broad Green 

Aigburth 

C Hhbshirk. 

Birkenhead 

Tranmere 

Scacombe 

New Brighton 

Hew Ferry 

Eastham 

Chester 

Liscard 

Buncorn 

Hoylake 

Farkgate 

Upton and Frodsham 

North wich 

Knutsford ..... 

Wallasey 

Barnston 

B 



2370 

52 

6 

19 

58 

37 

29 

4 

5 

10 

8 

7 
2 

4 
3 

12 

3 

2 

3 

2 

10 

3 

5 

4 
2 

8 
1 

3 
27 

6 
50 

7 

1 

13 

1 

2 

4 
6 

5 



Halebank 

Over 

Heswell 

Tarbuek 

Widnes ’’ 

Yorkshire. 

Leeds 

Bradford 

Sheffield ’ 

Heckmendwike 

Various plaees ' 

Huntingdon. 

Alton 

Durham. 

Newcastle-on-Tyne 

Shropshire. 

Lowheath 

Shrewsbury 

Derbyshire. 

Derby 

Nottinghamshire. 

Nottingham 

Cumberland. 

Cockerbam 

Warwickshire. 

Birmingham 

Essex. 

Bumford 

Lincolnshire. 

Grasby 

London 

Stafford 

Ireland. 

Belfast 

Dublin 

Scotland. 

Dumfriesshire 



1 

212 

32 

10 

8 

5 

6 
11 

8 

14 

3 

6 

3 

24 

3 

S 

0 



Wales. 

Flint 

Llanjwst .... 
Carnavon.... 
Angleasea . 
Denbigh .... 
Holyhead . 
Llangollen . 
Portmadock 
Welshpool . 

Isl* of Man. 
Douglas .... 



Channel Islands. 
Jersoy 



N*w York, 



4 
2 
2 
2 
2 

3 

2 

6 

2 

5 



1 

2 ' 

f> 

1 

4 

1 

2 

2 

2 



9 

2 

l 



Vi korf* ^ A kJ 



ANNUAL MEETING OF SUBSCRIBERS. 

y 



The Annual Meeting was held at the Hospital, Islington, on 
Tuesday, January 14th, 1868, his Worship the Mayor in the chair. 
Among those present were Messrs. William Tristram, Ansdell, 
Yeoward, Harrison, W. Bostock, jun., T. Lee, J. K. Main waring, 
C. F. Salt, Churton (the Coroner for Cheshire,) A. F. Thomson, 
W. L. Stroud, Bev. Mr. Welsh, Drs. Smyth, Caldwell, Mackinlay, 
Taylor, Dawson, Burrows, Henry, Homs, Galloway, &c., Messrs. 
H. Tristram, (hon. secretary,) Astrup Cariss, (auditor,) &c. &c. 

The meeting having been opened with prayer by the Bev. J. B. 
Welsh, A.M., 

Mr. Henry Tristram, honorary secretary, read the report of 
the Committee. 

Mr. Astrup Cariss read the financial statement. 

After Dr. Smyth had submitted his Beport, 

The Mayor: Gentlemen, it now becomes my very pleasing 

duty to propose in very brief but not less hearty terms the adoption 
of the report which has been read, and in doing so I can say this, 
that though the necessity for an institution of this kind may in 
times past, perhaps, have been questionable, now with the facts 
before us we cannot doubt that a necessity does exist for a special 
institution of this kind devoting itself to the amelioration of that 
special class of disorders which are here relieved. No doubt an 
institution of this kind labours under great difficulties. It naturally, 
to some extent, creates a jealousy on the part of the older 
institutions of the town, and in some degree, perhaps, it excites 
the jealousy of some members of the medical profession. No 
doubt an institution which deals with a particular class of diseases 
must, to some extent, provoke feelings of hostility and jealousy in 



« 




19 



: the town. But when, gentlemen, you hear that during the six years 
of the existence of this institution no less than 100,000 cases 
have been relieved, you will at once see that the extent of this hind 
of disease is such that it would he utterly impossible for any of the 

■ existing institutions to relieve such distress and such misery. 
Those only who have witnessed this class of disease even in the case 
of the wealthy, who have known the sufferings which this disease 

■ produces, can alone estimate what its effects must be, when, coupled 

■ with the pain of the disease, there are attendant circumstances of 
•poverty, penury, and distress — those, I say, who are in wealthier 

circumstances have seen the suffeiings of their fellow-creatures, 

1 labouring under the disorders with which this institutions deals, can 
only estimate — slightly, perhaps, after all— the greater distress and 
the greater suffeiings which must be entailed on the sons and 
i daughters of penury and distress. — (Applause.) It is impossible to 
'.listen to the report of the Medical Officer, whose kind attention, 

; unwearied zeal, and unostentatious labours in connection with this 
i institution every one of us must value — (cheers) — it is impossible, I 
say, to listen to that tale of suffering and of distress without feeling 
l that this institution has peculiar claims upon the liberality and the 
>s»pport of the wealthier inhabitants of this great town of Liverpool. 

! It may be a question, gentlemen, but this, perhaps, is not the time 
t to enter into it, whether all the hospitals ot the town might not be 
t united under one general committee, and whether in those hospitals 
(.different wards might not be formed, attended to by different 
i. medical men who have devoted themselves particularly to special 
cases of diseases, by which means perhaps greater economy might 
be exercised and greater results attained. It is possible that in the 
: future some such plan may be adopted, but until that plan is adopted 
[ am sure that the plan of medical men who have devoted them- 
p selves to one particular class of disease attending the different 
aospitals is the plan that is best calculated to meet the wants and 
:o meet the necessities of those who labour under different kinds of 
liseases.— (Hear, hear !) We know that in the higher ranks of the 
profession there are gentlemen, medical men of great experience, who 
t lave devoted themselves specially to particular kinds of disease, and 
,ve know that when we labour under particular ailments we consult 
.hose men who have devoted themselves specially to that particular 
Mass of disease, and why should not the sons and daughters of 
overty have the same benefit which we, the wealthier class, possess ? 
|— (Applause.) Therefore I for one am glad that the poor in this 
neighbourhood and in this town have the advantages of the skill 
■md attention of the kind and philanthropic gentleman who has 
levoted himself specially to these most painful and heart-rending 
liseases. — (Applause.) It must be very satisfactory to the 

Medical Officer and to those gentlemen who have laboured with 
. dm through evil report and good report to soe this institution 






20 



steadily increasing in the favour and in the support of the public. 
I see reference is made in the report to one gentleman, -who, I myself 
heard in the Council, very ably and very eloquently advocate the 
cause of this institution. — (Hear, hear!) — and to •whose exertions 
mainly it is that this institution has received an annual grant 
from the Corporation of £ 50 . — (Applause.) Gentlemen, we must 
not forget that this institution is purely a charitable one ; 
that, with the exception of the small amount of fees received 
from patients who are supposed to he in a wealthier position, 
and who are able to pay a late fee — with that exception the 
attendance and drug3 are given to the patients gratuitously. 
This ought, therefore, to commend itself to the charity of the bene- 
volent public. I am glad to see — and yet, at the same time, while it 
is a source of gladness to see that this institution is being more 
appreciated than it was, it is also with sorrow that we see that the 
number of those labouring under this form of disease is so largely 
in excess of what perhaps any of us believed, — I say I am glad to 
see, since such misery and such diseases exist, that each year a 
considerable accession of cases is brought -under your knowledge 
and under the treatment of this institution. — (Hear, hear!) As is 
very well stated in the report, it is a peculiar species of disease ; 
many labour under it in secret ; many don’t like to admit that 
they are labouring under this class of disease, and therefore carry 
about with them from day to day, and from week to week, the seeds 
of a disease which, if not arrested, must bring the sufferer 
ultimately to a painful and an early grave. — (Hear, hear!) But 
when an instiution of this kind is established, which deals specially 
with those cases, and when they meet with one so kind and so 
philanthropic to his patients as the Medical Officer of this institu- 
tion, I have no doubt that many persons who have hitherto secretly 
borne their sorrow come forward from time to time and receive the 
relief which this institution so generously affords. That it is so, 
and that it has been so, gentlemen, this report abundantly proves ; 
for, while I find that, in the year 1865 , 1,800 patients were 
treated, I find that, in 1867 , the number had increased to 3 , 164 . 
This, gentlemen, tells its own tale, and I am glad to see that, while 
the number of the patients who seek relief in this institution are 
increasing on the one hand, on the other the number of its friends 
and supporters from this large community is steadily increasing 
also. — (Hear, hear !) I will not trespass longer upon your attention. 
I now have the pleasure — and I assure you it is a great pleasure to 
me to be permitted to take part in the proceedings to-day, and to 
lend whatever aid I can to Dr. Smyth and to the members of the 
Committee in advancing the interests of this institution — I now have 
the pleasure to move— 

“ That the Report and Statement of Accounts as now pro- 



21 



sented be adopted, and that copies thereof be printed 
and circulated.” 

. Mr. C. F . Salt had very great pleasure in seconding the motion 
which was agreed to. ’ 

The Mayor, then proposed — 

“ That the thanks of the Meeting be given to the President, 
Vice-Presidents, Committee, Auditor, Treasurer, and 
Honorary Secretary, for their valuable services during 
the past year.” 

He was sure he had no occasion to say anything to commend this 
resolution to their acceptance. — (Hear, hear !) 

The motion was seconded by Dr. Henry, and carried unani- 
mously. 

The Mayor said : The next motion he had to make was — 

“That the thanks of the Subscribers and Donors of this 
Hospital be given to its Senior Honorary Surgeon, and 
to those Medical Men who have assisted him .” 

He was certain that no words of his would be wanting to commend 
this resolution to the meeting. The duties performed in that institu- 
tion, and the philanthropic and unpaid-for services which had been 
rendered by the Medical Officers, would, he was sure, commend the 
resolution in far more eloquent terms to their acceptance than any 
words he could utter. — (Applause.) 

Dr. Dawson, in seconding the motion, said he had intended 
to make some observations, but after the very lucid and able 
manner in which the Mayor had gone through the history of the 
institution and the diseases treated therein, there was nothing- 
left for him to say. Ho merely wished to state, in passing, how 
much they were indebted to the Mayor for the very able manner 
in which he had presided over that meeting and for the time he had 
devoted to the investigation of this subject. His Worship had 
come there not merely in his offical capacity as the Mayor simply, 
they were all proud to see him as such. — (Hear, hear!) — but he 
had thoroughly studied the nature of the institution, and, to use 
a peculiar phrase, was able “ to meet the case almost in particular.” 
(Laughter and applause.) Alluding to the many duties his Worship 
had to perform, Dr. Dawson said he had asked the Mayor a short 
time since how he managed to get through all his work, and the reply 
he received was that twice a week his Worship rose at three o’clock 
in the morning, and so tried to overtake his private duties, so that he 
might be able to devote the necessary time to his public ones. — 
(Applause.) They could see after this that a three o’clock in the 
morning study had been thrown into the speech the Mayor had 
just made. — (Laughter.) Although ho knew his Worship to bo a 



22 



diffident man, and one who did not like being praised, he hoped he 
would receive what he had said in the proper spirit — (Hear, hear !) 

The motion having been agreed to, Dr. Smtth briefly returned 
thanks in the name of the Medical Officers. 

The May on next proposed — 

“That the Committee for the ensuing year, 186S, consist 
of the following gentlemen : — Joseph Harrison, Esq., 
T.C., E. C. Janion, Esq., T.C., John Eogers, Esq., 
T.C.,* Eev. J. E. Welsh, A.M., Thos. Lee, Esq., J. K. 
Mainwaring, Esq., James M‘Neilledge, Esq., F. H. 
Powell, Esq., W. L. Stroud, Esq., A. F. Thomson, Esq., 
William Bostock, Esq., and H. Tristram, Hon. Sec , 
pro tem." 

This was seconded by Mr. Astrup Cariss, and agreed to. 

Mr. Harrisox moved — 

“ That the best thanks of this Meeting he accorded to the 
Worshipful the Mayor of Liverpool, Edward Whitley, 
Esq., for his kindness in presiding.” 

In the course of his remarks Mr. Harrison pointed out that the 
institution was appreciated, not only by the poor and afflicted of 
Liverpool, hut also by those in the neighbourhood, St. Helens, Che- 
shire, and other parts of the United Kingdom. It was only by visiting 
the institution that people could be made aware of its great value. 
In conclusion, he had no doubt that, after the kind support and 
countenance they had received from the Mayor, the institution 
would go on and prosper. 

Dr. Burrows seconded the motion, which was earned amid 
acclamation. 

The Mayor, in acknowledging the compliment, assured the meet- 
ing that, among the many duties which devolved upon him as 
Mayor, none were so congenial to his feelings as those which called 
upon him to unite with his fellow-men in relieving distress. If he 
had done any good in coming among them that day he had his own 
reward in that conviction. — (Applause.) 

The meeting then separated. 



Before the proceedings commenced the Mayor went through the 
various wards, and informed himself as to the internal economy and 
working of the institution.* 



I 



23 



GOVERNORS FOR LIFE. 

Bang Benefactors of fio or upwards at one time. 



THE WORSHIPFUL THE MAYOR, 
EDWARD WHITLEY, Esq. 
ROBERTSON GLADSTONE, Esq. 

THOMAS BERRY HORSFALL, Esq., M.P. 
THOMAS AYISON, Esq., 

EDWARD BATES, Esq. 

JAMES BEAZLEY, Esq. 

H. M. BRIGHT, Esq., (Executors of) 
RALPH BROCKLEBANK, Sex., Esq. 
ALFRED CASTELLAIN, Esq. 

EDWARD MOON, Esq. 

JOHN MOORE, Esq., The Retreat, Whitehaven. 
JOHN PEARSON, Esq. 

• FREDERICK H. POWELL, Esq. 

ROBERT RANKIN, Esq. 

WILLIAM RATHBONE, Sex., Esq. 
CHARLES ROWE, Esq. 

. JOHN JAMES ROWE, Esq. 

J. SEATON SMYTH, Esq., M.D. 

Mrs. DENNISON 
Mrs. HENRY PENNY 



DONORS. 



A Grateful Patient * £1 0 

A Cash •' 1 0 

A Friend 1 0 

A Friend 0 10 



0 

0 

0 

0 



24 






Bright, Hngh M., Bepresentatives of the late 100 0 0 

Balfour, Williamson and Co., 5, Cook-street 5 0 0 

Braga, Jose M , Tower-buildings, Water-street , 10 0 

Ditto, ditto, ditto (2nd donation - )... 10 0 

Bra'un, Francis C., Walmer Buildings, Water-street 10 0 

B. S : 110 

Bates, Edward, Bellefield, West Derby 10 0 0 

Brocklebank, Ralph, sen., Childwall hall, Child wall 10 0 0 

Busch, Gustav, Royal Bank-buildings, Dale-street 110 

Badger, J. R., Prospect-vale, Fairfield 1 0 0 

Clare, William, The Hollies, Fairfield 5 0 0 

Corisli, James, 20 and 22, Tarleton-street 5 0 0 

Case, Mrs 10 0 

Cobham, John, Slater-court, Castle-street 1 0 0 I 

Dixon, Wm. and Co., Northwestern Bank-buildings, Dale-st. 0 10 0 

Ewart, Christopher J., New Brighton 5 0 O' 

Ellerton, William, Albert-buildings, Preeson’s-row 0 10 0 

Farnworth, John, Liverpool and London Chambers, 

Exchange * 5 0 0 j 

Finlay, Kirkman, Peter’s-buildings, 11, Rumford-street 5 0 0 

Formby, R. and E., Chapel-walks, South Castle-street 110’ 

Ditto, ditto, ditto (2nd donation)... 110 

Friends, per Miss Harrison, Argyle-street, Birkenhead $ 0 0 

Fallows, John, 12 to 16, Peter’s-lane 2 0 0 

Forshaw, Henry, 12, Sweeting-street 110 

Gladstone, Robertson, Court-hey, Broad-green 5 5 0 

Ditto, ditto, ditto (2nd donation)... .5 5 0 

Garston, Edgar, 3, Rumford-place 3 3 0 

Gladstone, Lawrence, 31, Strand-street 10 0; 

Gardiner, G. N., 3, Litherland-alley 10 0 

Horsfall, Thomas Berry, M.P., Bellamour Hall, Rugeley, 

Staffordshire 21 0 0 

Huth, Frederick and Co., 22, Chapel-street 10 10 0 

Hulse, George, 146, Dale-street 110 

Houghton, Edward P., 18 and 20, Seel-street ...., 10 0 

Hunt, Samuel, 23, Harrington-street 0 10 6 

Invalid Lady 1 ® J 

Jones, William, 35, Catherine-otreet 1 1 ® f 



- 



25 



Jackson, Henry, South end Duke’s Dock 

Ditto, ditto, ditto (2nd donation)... 

Jones, Robert and Sons, 2, South Castle-street 

Jones, Robert, 20, South Castle-street 



0 10 0 
0 10 0 
10 0 
0 10 0 



Kohn-Speyer, J. L., 12, 
Ditto 



Ruinford-place 

ditto (2nd donation)... 



1 1 0 
1 1 0 



Lawrence Edward, Beech Mount, Aighburth 5 o 0 

Lawrence, John T., Anfield 5 0 0 

Loxdale, George H., The Albany, Oldhali-street......'.'.'.'.'.’.'.’.’.’ 1 1 0 



Moss, Mrs., Otterspool, Aigburth 5 0 0 

Moss, Thomas Edwards, Roby Hall 5 o 0 

Moon, Edward, The Lawn, Aigburth 10 0 0 

Morris, John Grant, Allerton Priory, Allerton 5 0 0 

Norris, Mrs., Berkshire... 10 0 



Okell, George, 59, Canning-street 110 

Pearson, John, Arley House, Seaforth 10 0 0 

Rankin, Robert, 55, South John-street 10 0 0 

Rathbone, William, Sen., Green Bank, Wavertree 10 0 0 

Rowe, Charles, 22, Chapel-street 10 0 O 

Rowe, John James, 22, Chapel-street 10 0 0 

Rathbone, William, Jun., 21, Water-street 5 0 0 

Robinson, Prestan, and Co., 57 and 59, St. James-street ... 5 0 0 

Rathbone, Samuel G., 21, Water-street 2 2 0 

Stroud, W. Lawrence, Middleton-buildings, Rumford-street 10 0 

S. M 2 2 0 

Smith, Samuel. 4, Chapel-street 2 2 0 

Smyth, J. Seaton, M.D 25 0 0 



Thomson, James 5 0 0 

Wild, Henry, 52, Hanovcr-street 110 

XY 0 5 3 



26 



ANNUAL SUBSCEIBEES. 



Allan, Bryce, Alexandra-buildings, James-street £110 

Anderson, Alexander B., Central-chambers, South Castle 

street 110 

Armstrong, John Richardson, Fraser, Trenholm, and Co., 

10, Rumford-place 110 

Ashe, Theophilus F., 13 and 15, Atherton-street 110 

Aspinall, Richard H., 1, Leece-street 110 

Avison, Tbomas, Fulwood Park, Aigburth 1 1 0 

Blood, Wolfe, and Co., 34, Moorfields 2 2 0 

Babcock, Benjamin F., 17, Water-street 110 

Balfour, Alexander, Alexandra-buildings, James-street ... 110 

Bartlett, Thomas, 32, Castle-street 110 

Baruchson and Co., Hackins-hey 110 

Beazley, James, Peters-buildings, 11, Rumford-street 1 1 0 

Bell, T. and R., 3, Cases-street 110 

Bennett, George and Sons, 13, Fenwick-street 110 

Best, Rodger, and Co., 34, Moorfields 1 1 0 

Bingham, John and Co., 7, Brunswick-street 110 

Bird, Thomas V., 12, Canning-place 1 1 0 

Bostock, William, Jun., 20, James-street 110 

Boutcher, Mortimore, and Co., 31, King-street 110 

Bowring, Charles T., 53, South John-street 110 

Briscoe, Walter, Cable-street Chambers, 3, Cable-street... 110 

Brocklebank, Ralph, Sen., Childwali Hall, Childwall 110 

Brocklebank, Ralph, Jun., do., do 10 0 

Brown, Stewart H., Richmond-buildings, Chapel-street... 110 

Brown, William, and Co., 8 and 10, Derby-street 110 

Bouch, Thomas, 1, Oldhall-street 1 0 0 

Buchardt, Otto, Bank Chambers, Cook-street 10 0 

Bulley, Samuel Marshall, Brown’s-buildings, Exchange... 10 0 

Bairstow, William B., Bull Hotel, Dale-street 0 10 6 

Barrett, John C., Oldhall-street 0 10 6 

Bromley, J., Chemist, Commutation-row 110 

Corporation of Liverpool 50 0 0 

Cox, Henry, Bromborough, Cheshire 2 2 0 



27 



Coxhead, — , Bickerstaffe 

1 Caine, Nathaniel, 40, Upper Parliament-street 

1 Carlisle, Thomas, 24 and 25, The Albany, Oldhall-street... 

(Cavafy and Co., 15, Fenwick-street 

(.Christie, Robert, Jun., 3, Oldhall-street 

(Church, Charles, 10, Rumford-place 

Churton and Tomlinson, Brazilian-buildings, Drury -lane 

(Clarkson, William, 117, Islington 

'Cliff, William, 50 and 51, The Albany, Oldhall-street 

(Cobb, John, 125, Dale-street 

• Cookson, Thomas W., 1, Mersey-street 

(Connell and Co., 34, Mathew-street 

(Croggon and Co., 2, Goree Piazzas 

• Crooks, Robert, o, Molyneux-place, 18, Water-street 

(Crosfield, James, 28, Temple-court 

(Crosfield, William, Do. 

• Cox, A. R., Northwestern Bank-buildings, Dale-street... 

(Calvert, Miss, 106, Bold-street 

(Cropper, William, 21, Harrington-street 

(Crosbie, Charles E., 6, North John-street 

(Crossley, F., Halifax 

IDickins, Benjamin, West Derby-road 

Dickson, Boardman and Co., 18§, South Castle-street ... 

‘Dalglish, William, 9, Harrington-street 

IDavidson, Elliott W., Alexandra-buildiugs, James-street 

IDawbarn, William, The Temple, Dale-street 

IDixon, Charles E., 9, Rumford-place 

JDixon, A., • Do. 

1 Dobell, George C., Bretherton-buildings, 10, North John 

street I 

IDod and Case, 52, St. Ann-street 

iDowdall, Thomas, 16, North John-street 

1 Duarte, Ricardo T., Royal Bank-buildings, Dale-street ... 
iDuguid, Thomas, Jun., Old Castle-chambers, Preeson’s 

row 

IDuranty, Alexander, Corn Exchange-buildings, 9, 

Brunswick-street 

I Duncan, Ewing and Co., Liverpool and London Chambers, 

Exchange 

1 Dutton, Samuel, 28, Huskisson-street 

lEarles and King, 5, Oil-street 

fEccles, Alexander, Exchange-alley, Chapel-street 

iEdmiston, Archibald and Co., 18, Union-street 

lEdwards, Edward E., 4, Chapel-street 

fEvaus, Sons and Co., 56, Hanover-stroet 



0 10 6 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 
110 
110 
110 
110 
1 1 0 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
10 0 
10 0 
1 0 0 
2 2 0 

2 2 0 
2 2 0 
110 
110 
110 
1 1 0 
1 1 O 

110 
110 
110 
1 1 0 

1 1 0 

110 

110 

110 

110 
110 
110 
1 1 0 
110 



28 



Ewart, Joseph Christopher, New Brighton 1 i o 

Eaton, John H., 24, St. James-road 0 10 6 

Elkington, Messrs., Church-street 110 

Eberle, P., Alexandra Hotel 1 i q 

Fletcher, G. H. aud Co., Albany, Oldhali-street 110 

Fletcher, James and Co., 10, Rurcnord-place 1 1 O 1 

Fletcher, William H., 6, Cook-street 1 i o| 

Fogg, Nathaniel E., 298, Yauxhall-road 1 i o j 

Forrer, Henry, York-buddings, Sweeting-street 1 1 01 

Foi'rest, Frederick, 14, St. George’s-crescent 1 l O' 

Fox, Mrs. Henry Frederick 1 i oj 

Frisby, Dyke, and Co., Lord-street 1 i o! 

Fryer, John, 20, Dale-street 0 10 6i 

Goswell, Washington Hotel 1 1 oj 

Gair, Henry W., Drury-buildirgs, Water-street 1 1 01 

Gill, Cnapole, St. Peter’s- buildings, 13, Rumford-street... 1 10 

Gibbons, John. Chapel-walks, South Castle-street 1 1 o! 

Gladstone, Rooertson, Court-key, Broad Green 1 1 0 

Gordon, James and Co., 11, Orange-court, Castle-street... 1 1 Oj 

Graham, James, and Co., 21, Water-street 1 1 o; 

Graves, Samuel R., M.P., Baltlc-buildings, Redcross-street 1 1 0} 

Green. ‘J 1 . W., 1a, Canning street 1 1 Oi 

Griming, Louis, 22, Chapel- street 1 1 0 ! 

Garner, John, 16, Woo^-street 10 0. 

Gibbs, John, Doran’s-lane, Lord-street 0 10 6 

Gibson, Robert, Brazilian-buildings, Drury-lane 0 10 Oi 

Groom, William, 42, Lord-street t 0 10 0 



Horsfall, Thomas B., M.P., Bellamour Hall, Rugeler, 



Staffordshire 2 2 0 

Harrison, Tliomas and Co., Orange-court, Castle-street... 2 2 0 

Hall, Bernard 8, India-buildings, Fenwick-street 1 1 0 

Hamilton and Ramsay, 63, Paradise-street 1 1 0 

Harratt, John James, The Albany, Oldhali-street 1 1 0 

Harrison, Miss, 52, Argyle-street, Birkenhead 110- 

Harrison, James, 18, Chapel-street 110 

Harrison, John Wilson, 107, St. James-street 1 1 0 

Harrison, Joseph, 62 and 70, Great George-street 1 1 0 



Higgin, Thomas, 34, Tower-buildings, Water-street 110 

Hill, Ely, Cable-chambers, 3, Cable-street 110 



Holt, George, 21, Water-street 1 1 0 

Houghton, Miss, 84, Rodney-street 110 

Hull, Frederick, 6, Cook-street 110 

Huth, Frederick, and Co., 22, Chapel-street 110 

Higgs, John, 46, Lord-street 0 10 6 



29 



Harvey, Miss 

rrvine and Woodward, The Temple, Dale-street 

:aaes, John, 56. Whitechapel 

3ack, James and Co, 3, Lower Boundary-street 

nackson, F. H. W., 18, Hackins-hey 

r.anion, Robert C., 5 and 7, Ttthebarn-street 

ceffery and Co., Compton House 

c ohnson, Grainger, and Co., Hargreaves-buildings, 

Chapel-street 

ohnson, J. C., 34, James street 

ones, Anthony and Co., 84, Lord-street 

ones, James Fisher, 38, Chapel-street 

.ones, William B. and Co., 20, South Castle-street 

cenkinson, Thomas, and Co., 2, Chapel-street 

ohnstone, Samuel, and Co., 27, James-street 

iust, William, 3, Harrington-street 

ones, Thomas, 6, Water-street... 



0 10 0 

1 1 0 
0 10 6 

2 2 0 
2 2 0 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 

1 1 0 
1 1 0 
110 
110 
1 1 0 
10 0 
10 0 
10 0 
0 10 6 



Gurtz, Charles, and Sons, 3, Carruthers-street 

Geizer, Lawrence, 44, Whitechapel 

Gellock, C. W., and Co., Walmer-buildings, 6, Water- 

street 

Gelso, Archibald, 25, Falkner-street 

Geliy, The Butterman 

Girkpatrick, M, and R., 75 and 77, Rose-place 

Gnapman, William, 138, Dale-street 



2 2 0 
1 1 0 

1 1 0 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 
110 
0 7 6 



. aird Brothers, Birkenhead 

aird, Macgregor, 4, Chapel-street 

.lawrence, Edward, Beech Mount, Aigburth 

. zawrence, John T., Anfield 

wee, Thomas, 16, Castle-street • •••• 

. /ear, Charles and Sons, Law Association-buildings, Cook- 

street 

. .edward, Charles Ortt, The Albany, Oldhall-street 

. /edward, Septimus, The Albany, Oldhall-street 

. /eishman and Welsh, 4, Vulcan street 

-zevey, Augustus Samuel, Temple Court-chambers, 

Temple-court 

wittle, James, 3, Rodney-street 

-/und, William, 44a, Kay-street ; 

. /iverpool Printing and Stationery Co., 38, Castle-street 

^jeece, John, Baltic- buildings, Redcross-street 

.jloyd, Thomas, 17, Sweeting-street •••••• •/ 

Hacfie and Sons, 34, Moorfields 



2 2 0 
1 1 0 
110 
110 
110 

1 1 0 
110 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 

1 1 0 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 
0 10 6 
0 10 0 
0 10 o 

3 3 0 



30 



Myers, John J., Huyton 

Maclver, C., Abercrom by-square, and Dovecot House 

Knotty Ash ’ 

Maclver, John, Abercromby-square, and Dovecot House, 

Knotty Ash 

Main waring, John K., West Side George’s Dock 

Marsden, George, 5, Old Church-yard 

Martin, Thomas, 22, Copperas-hill ' 

Mathison and Beausire, The Temple, Dale-street 

Maxwell, A. F. and R., 30, Brunswick-streot 

Medical 

Menasce, J. L., Sons and Co., Fenwick-court, 8, Fenwick- 

street 

Milner, Thomas and Sons, 8, Lord-street 

Minton, Richard R., 45 to 57, Cheapside 

Moran, Galloway and Co., Tower-buildings, Water-street 

Mossop, John, 16, Great Orford-street 

Moss, Mrs., Otterspool, Aigburth 

Muirhead, William, 39 and 41, Leece-street 

M'Neilledge, Jas., (Messrs. Suter, M'Neilledge, and Co.,) 
South Castle-street 

Nelson, Mrs., 42, Oxford-street 

Owen, Charles, 181, Upper Parliament-street 

Peet, W. PI., Editor of the Liverpool Journal of Commerce 

Penny, Mrs., Lance-lane, Wavertree 

Papayanni, George M., Fen wick-chambers, 8, Fenwick- 

street 

Paris and Co., Tower-buildings, Water-street 

Pearson, Edward, 301, Park-road 

Powell, Frederick H., Hargreaves-buildiugs, Chapel-street 
Price, John, 59, Whitechapel 

Rankin, Robert, 55, South John-street 

Rathbone, Samuel G., Drury-buildings, 21, Water-street 
Rathbone, William, Jun.,Drury-buildings, 21, Water-street 

Rawlinson, Mrs 

Rawsthorne, James, 292 and 294, Great Howard-street ... 

Rea and Son, Eldon-chambers, South John-street 

Rogers, John, 95 aud 97, Great George-street 

Rowe, John James, Alexandra-buildings, James-street ... 

Rowe, Charles, Alexand-a-buildings, James-street 

Radcliffe, Reginald, 14, St. George’s-crescent 

Robinson and Preston’s Brewery Company, 57 and 59, 
St. James-street 



2 2 0 

2 2 0 

1 1 0 
110 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 
110 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 

1 1 0 
1 1 0 
110 
110 
110 
10 0 
110 

110 

1 1 0 

110 

1 1 0 
2 2 0 

1 1 0 
110 
110 
1 1 0 
0 10 6 

2 2 0 
110 
10 0 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 
110 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 
110 
10 0 

0 10 & 



31 



'rmyth, Rev. William 

J :alt, Charles F., 24, Grove-street 

\eville and Company, 12, Tithebarn-street 

:haw, Charles and Co., 2, Rumford-place 

: rmitb, James, 4, Chapel-street 

ismith, Samuel, 4, Chapel-street 

: :myth, Ross, T. and Co., 2, Drury lane ' 

5; teel, Robert, North Western Bank-buildings, Dale-street 

ittone, William, 6, Cook-street 

; :troud, William L., Middleton-buildings, Rumford-street 

•wire, John and Sons, The Temple, Dale-street 

:tewart, Robert Edward, 37, Rodney-street 

'appenbeck and Co., India-buildings, Water-street 

Vyrer, William and James, Mersey-chambers, Old 

Church yard 

Taylor, Tipper, and Co., Hargreaves-buildings, Chapel- 

street 

Thomson, A. F., Hackins-hey 

Vod and Ashton, Liver-chambers, Tithebarn-street 

:arbett, William, Jun., 10, Tower-buildings, Water- 

street 

i inling, Charles, Editor of the Liverpool Courier 

iin Amigo, Rumford-place 

'/elsh, Rev. J. R., 33, Huskisson-street 

-/aterhouse, John D., 1, Oldhall-street 

^aterhouse, William, 1, Oldhall-street 

i Titty, Michael James, Editor Post and Journal 

/ilde, Henry, 52, Hanover-street 

'Tlson, George 

'/ilson, John Hays, Cornhill, Wapping 

/ood, James M., Commercial-buildings, Water-street ... 
fTod, James M., Jun., Commercial-buildings, Water- 

street 

'/right and Stevenson, Cable-street 

|7 illiams, John, Maison Doree, Bold-street 



2 2 0 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 
110 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 
1 1 0 
110 
110 
1 1 0 
0 10 0 

2 2 0 

2 2 0 

1 1 0 
110 
110 

0 10 0 
1 1 0 

1 1 0 

2 0 0 
1 1 0 
110 
110 
1 1 0 
10 0 
110 
1 1 0 

1 1 0 
1 1 o 
1 1 0 



32 



The following have promised Subscriptions for 1868 : — 



Bell, George, Hatton -garden 1 l 

Mors le Blanch and Co., D 1 1 

Huxham, V 1 1 

Bigland, Ed win 1 1 

Bowden, W 1 1 

Williams, George 1 1 

Davey, Henry 1 1 

Baker, Samuel 1 1 

Spalding, W 0 10 



DONATIONS TO THE BUILDING FUND. 



The Worshipful the Mayor, Edward Whitley, Esq 10 10 

Thomson, James, Esq 5 0 



Besides these amounts a considerable sum has been promised. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



Persons who are disposed to contribute by Will to this Institution a 
respectfully requested to do so in the following manner : — 

I give and bequeath unto A. B. and C. D. the sum of 

upon trust that they do pay the same out of my personal estate 
the Treasurer for the time being of the Institution called “ TJJ 
Liverpool Hospital for Cancer and Skin Diseases,” which sum 

1 desiro may be applied towards carrying on the chaiital 

designs of the said Institution.